Amalfi Coast, Italy

My post from the Amalfi Coast

IMG_9491To quote my friend, Anna Moyer: “It’s hard to overstate the beauty of the Amalfi coast.”  On the bus, every hairpin turn was breathtaking.  You’re incredibly high up from the waters below, and the towns living in the mountainside are beautiful as they peak around each curve in the road.

We arrived in Positano after an early morning flight and two crowded SITA buses, yet time stood still for the rest of the day as we explored the many nooks and crannies of this dreamy place.  Positano is full of numerous staircases, and long winding roads, that will do a number on your calves.  We took a very, very leisurely pace the entire time as this was Corey’s first trip since Tignes.

Near the main docks, there were numerous linen boutiques, sandal shops, and limoncello grocers.  Lemons are big here- not just in popularity but also in size.  I also loved the stores selling ceramic-ware painted with bright lemons against navy on all sorts of bowls and platters.

We dipped our toes in the super clear water, and took a nap on the pebbly beach late in the afternoon, before making the trek back up to the local Trattoria.

The streets are lovely as you can see.  Many of them are draped with wisteria or have brightly painted building.  We imagined how crowded it must feel in the summer as you can barely walk two by two on the narrow lanes.  On the street sides, single file is a must so you aren’t nipped by a local bus or scooter.  I couldn’t stop taking pictures around every twist and turn.


This morning, I tried running stairs to get the day started but I only lasted about twenty minutes.  The Positano steps kicked my butt, but there is no photographic evidence as I could barely breathe, no less snap a selfie!  Wouldn’t an early lunch be a better idea?  Corey found Fattoria La Tagliata, a true gem, up towards the town of Nocelle.  I wanted to visit Nocelle as this is where the Il Sentiero degli Dei (Path of The Gods) trailhead starts/ends, but honestly, if you didn’t want to hike, then I’d still highly suggest a trip to this restaurant as your main activity for the day.  It felt like the Italian grandmother-chefs were picking young garlic right out of the garden to use for our family style meal (and later we discovered there was a mini-farm outside!)  You arrive on the terrace and three small plates with a bottle of house wine are immediately brought to your table. There is no need for a menu.  Prego!!!

We didn’t do the Path of the Gods as it was too strenuous for my kidney-healing man, but we did take the bus to Nocelle so that I could at least say I saw the entrance to the path.  If we return to the coast, I’ll be bringing a solid pair of hiking boots.

The remainder of the day was spent on the small terrace in our hotel room just taking in the gorgeous scenery and reviving my blog (or ‘slog’ as Corey has taken to calling it as it’s majorly delayed in posts (slow + blog= slog).  Better yet, wait for the exclusive to Corey’s blog- or ‘clog’- coming out…. TBD 🙂


Day three took us on a day trip to Amalfi, another town just a thirty minute boat ride along the coast.  The town has a smaller beach, but a livelier square and Duomo.

Visitors can enter the crypts and cathedral for a mere three Euro to see the Monumental Complex of St. Andrew.  We had a seaside lunch followed by a gelato cone (I found the sorbet yogurt flavor and felt very satisfied).  We didn’t indulge in the fried seafood cones along the way, but did some window shopping for linen, leather and limoncello.

We caught another crowded SITA bus up to Ravello, a very pretty town, high up in the cliffs.  Suggestion for SITA straphangers: buy your round trip tickets at the tabacchi shop, and get to the busstop early.  We were visiting in April when it’s less crowded and still felt the pushing and shoving to climb aboard.  Though SITA looks like our version of a charter bus, they line people up into the aisles like a local city bus.

Ravello was as picturesque as ever, and we spent a majority of our time in the Villa Cimbrone, an exclusive hotel with gardens that are open to the public.  The wisteria that hang down along the walk and the stunning views of the Mediterranean made it well worth the 7 Euro.

On the way back from the gardens, we opted for Mimi Bar Pizzeria for a quick meal before our Ravello Piano Concert.  Jackpot!!! The pizza crust was chewy and delicious, and it was the best pasta with ‘sea fruit’ (clams and mussels) I had on the entire trip!!! I can’t say enough good stuff. The trip advisor reviews in the link below don’t have enough exclamation points to do the restaurant justice. We will definitely return if we are in Ravello for more red sauce and seafood.

Ravello’s Concert Hall offers weekly concerts in a small venue with great acoustics.  If you’re into classical music, this would be a must see.  This is illustrated by the fact that we ran into one of Corey’s colleagues while waiting for the concert to start!  She had heard similar reviews of Ravello’s concert society and made sure to stop in as well.  Giuseppe Di Bianco’s piano recital concluded our already peaceful afternoon.  Unfortunately, after the limoncello at intermission, we had to leave to catch the last bus to Amalfi and Positano.  Stepping out into the quiet stone paths after hearing a talented musician made for a great evening.  Add to this, the local church was holding their Good Friday procession, complete with babies dressed as angels, and a candle lit parade.


We left Positano mid morning and spent the day wandering the new, flatter streets of Sorrento.  The area feels a bit less ‘beach-vacationy’ as the beach is much smaller here, though the waters are just as clear blue when you look over the edge of the boulevards. It’s easy to take day trips from Sorrento as well so there is a city/ transport feeling, in my opinion.

There’s more affordable shopping here, and more space for outdoor eateries. We didn’t find a great lunch spot, but we didn’t find a lovely linen shop where the gentlemen dressed Corey to the nines! The fashionista spirit of Italy is still strong though we were many miles from Milan.  We were offered delicious samples at Nino and Friends, a souvenir shop featuring local treats.  I found a purse that I couldn’t resist, and then we made our way to the grocery store to ensure we had provisions for Easter Sunday and Monday.  We learned that many restaurants would be closed or would have limited hours for the holiday so it was time to stock up for an Easter picnic.  Would you believe we met a family from Ewing at the grocery store!?  Corey has a magnet for meeting people around the world!  While he reminisced about dirty Jersey highlights with two college-aged siblings, I purchased mortadella, parma ham, olives and artichoke hearts with their mom.  Her son is studying abroad in Germany, and he and his sister bought their mom a ticket to travel to Italy for the first time on their spring break.

Dinner was around the corner from our hotel, and the fish of the day with homemade pasta was a major thumbs up.  We also spotted many tables sharing multiple pizzas so it seems you can’t make a bad choice at Il Convivio.


Since Sorrento is a hub for day trips, we caught an early train to Pompeii and Erculano to see the historical ruins created by Mt. Vesuvius.  On Easter Sunday, the trains stop running at 1pm so we did a quick tour at each site, and promised to read up on these when we had more time.  You can see just how intricate the cities must have been, and Ercolano still had paintings on the walls as well!

We ventured into the side streets of Ercolano and saw Easter parades with flags and traditional dress.  The slight drizzle couldn’t stop the celebrations and chants. I wondered how much I should be considering that Mt. Vesuvius is still an active volcano even though we were most likely just hearing thunder rolling in with the rain clouds.

We found a serious bakery selling Easter treats and gelato. Yes, of course, we joined in with the purchasing of pastries and spun gelato cones, even in the rain.

We enjoyed our picnic lunch by the hotel pool and spent the remainder of the grey afternoon between the hotel lobby tethered to wifi and the hotel bar for a beer and wine happy hour.

Dinner was at Ristorante Bagni Delfino, a restaurant right on the docks that was open on Easter Sunday.  The staff was incredibly nice, and I must say the gratis pre-dinner prosecco was a nice touch.  After the sun set, the main square in Sorrento still felt lively, with many people out celebrating the holiday.  Everyone was dressed up and out with kids and loved ones, treating themselves to gelato or just enjoying the night lights.


For our last full day on the coast, we caught an early boat out to the Isle of Capri.  We hit a bump in the road, or should I say, a bump in the waves, as they felt reminiscent to the waves on our Thailand trip. Corey soothed me by telling me the waves were not nearly as rocky as we’d experienced before (which was true), and that we were ‘almost there’ numerous times even when we weren’t.  I admittedly found myself pumped with more adrenaline than I’d expected while on the boat so getting back on solid ground was a good start to being on the island.  Truthfully, the views didn’t compare to Positano, Amalfi or Ravello as we took the uphill walk to the town center. High end shops and small cafes line Piazza Umberto, the main plaza, where you’ll find many day-trippers.

We wandered to the Giardini di Augusto to look out on the Faraglioni, two distinct rock formations in the true blue sea.  Unfortunately, there weren’t boats being allowed into the Grotta Azzurra, as the waves were too choppy.  We hear the magnificent blue ocean is supposed to be unreal in this cavern.

We sat along the garden walls with our parma, olives, tomatoes, pesto and bread picnic lunch as many of the Capri eateries are expensive.  Corey treated himself to a ‘Capri Special’ drink: fresh orange juice with lemon granita.  It dawned on me that Capri Sun must be based on this very juice!  We traveled back down to the Marina Grande on the funicolar, a train that goes straight up and down the hill on one track (just like the one on the snowy mountains of Tignes).

O’ Parrucchiano had the most stunning ambiance.  It felt like dining in a magical citrus grove, and I asked that Corey propose to me again because it was such a fairytale.  Stick to the seafood dishes as my veal Milanese wasn’t much to write home about.  As we walked home from dinner, teems of people were spilling out of Gelateria Primavera so we had to try it…When in Rome? (the saying still applies even in Southern Italy, right?)



Naples

A few people told us to skip Naples–that it wasn’t worth dedicating a night of our trip here.  But we liked seeing the different personality of this city.  Yes, it’s grittier than any locale on the Amalfi coast, but it’s also the third largest city in Italy.  It’s a mix of graffitied walls, and quaint restaurants, with neighborhoods that are definitely showing signs of change in many ways.

Our first day of walking was close to Piazza Dante.  The neighborhood lanes had two sides. The main strip, Via Dei Tribunali, was lined with pizza shops, souvenirs booths, and churches offering tours of the underground cities of Naples.  Off this main drag were dollar stores, tobacco carts, and drabber alleys brightened only with hanging laundry.

The central duomo’s interior was beautiful, and the plaza in front was a hangout for teens, and boys playing futbol. We participated in a slightly uneventful tour of the San Lorenzo Maggiore Scavi Museo to see the ancient market buried below the foundation of the church.  The fact that Naples has underground tunnels, markets, and piazzas is really neat, but the tour wasn’t too exciting…more of a tourist trap upon reflection.

Via Toledo is full of commercial shops like H&M and Adidas but this huge street does lead you right down to the water.  We stopped for a caffè nocciolato at Il Vero Bar del Professore, a cafe renowned for rich hazelnut cream coffee.  Before heading to the seaside, you pass the gorgeous Basilica Real Pontificia San Francesco da Paola.  Cars aren’t able to drive along the waterfront (Via Caracciolo and Via Partenope) and it was nice to see joggers in the evening, and friends strolling along enjoying the views of Capri and Mt Vesuvius in the distance (we were sure we were looking at one of these!)

We passed Castel dell’Ovo, a fort-looking castle jutting right out on the waves.  Taking a right up past the huge waterfront hotels takes you to the Chiaia neighborhood. This is an area that feels completely different from the lanes we’d walked earlier in the day. There are boutiques and fine art galleries.  I’d read that we should visit a wine bar with a rooftop but before we found it, we passed BISI.  The owners swept us up before we could say no and they were terrific. The cocktails were perfect, especially since they were keen to create something based on our personal taste. With each drink, you’re served a board of small snacks done incredibly well. Apparently, the owners also have another spot called Trip which we will hit up on our next visit to Naples.

We still hadn’t had dinner but it was good that we had emptier stomachs for our meal at Tandem.  They are known for their rich meat ragu and meatballs.  I loved the checkered tablecloths in the intimate space.


 

 

It was amazing to see Corey’s energy returning each day. For our final day in Italy, he were up for more walking.  We took the funicular up to the Castel Sant’ Elmo to see the view of the entire city.

We visited the Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Donnaregina, or Madre, a contemporary art museum listed in the 36 Hours in Naples article. The entrance makes you feel like you’re in a funhouse.  We saw large walls highlighting art with one off kilter photograph, or a large circle with abstract scribbles.  I liked the gallery dedicated to imago mundi, a set of published books.  The works are voluntary and published in a collection to show contemporary art from countries all over the world.

By noon, it was time to brave the crowds to see if we could get a table at Pizzeria Gino Sorbillo.  If you’re in the birthplace of pizza, this is one of the most popular places to dine.  We arrived at twelve on the dot, and we were seated immediately–lucky us!  It definitely lived up to its reputation, and I even had a few bites with cheese to get the real experience.  A YUMMY last meal!!! It’s worth noting that there is another Sorbillo down the block, but it’s easy to tell the difference as there are swarms of people outside of the best one.

My summary for this trip: I can’t wait to visit Italy again! Neither can Corey. Check him out feelin’ good.

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Quickshot:

Positano (and the small town of Nocelle)

  • Eat at Fattoria La Tagliata (this is a 20 min bus ride outside of Positano so get yourself a bus timetable). Fattoria means farm, but I thought it could be a hint that you’ll gain weight after eating here….’fat’toria…get it?
  • Give yourself 4-5 hours for the Walk of the Gods (there are many other websites so if this one doesn’t suit you, no worries)
  • Spend an evening at a local trattoria- this is a more laid back vibe, less formal than a ristorante;  any locals can point you in the right direction. We enjoyed C’era Una Volte, up about 200 steps from our hotel.
  • Get lost in the shopping lanes and winding roads of Positano- no maps needed.  Just take in the views when you need a break.

Amalfi

  • Yes to gelato. All of it will be good.
  • See the Duomo di Amalfi (crypts and cathedral for a quick 3 euro)
  • Boat travel seemed optimal for a day trip to many of the coastal towns. Just make sure to check when the last boat leaves.

Ravello

Sorrento

  • Eat at Il Convivio (pizzeria and ristorante)
  • Walk to the seaside and sit on the docks on a sunny day
  • Eat at O’ Parrucchiano to feel like you’re in a fairytale grove
  • Shop at bottega21 for a bag or wallet or glasses case
  • Walk the main cobblestone lane to Nino and Friends for generous samples of Sorrento treats… even if you don’t have room in your suitcase

Napoli Food Suggestions

  • Apertivos must be at BISI– the owners are too good to their guests!
  • Eat at Tandem for ragu (make a reservation if you can)
  • For pizza, the first choice is Pizzeria Gino Sorbillo (Via dei Tribunali, 32). I’ve also heard that Da Michele is tasty and a close walk nearby if you didn’t want to wait.
  • Il Vero Bar del Professore for a coffee pitstop (Piazza Trieste e Trento)
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Athens, Greece

Κανόνες Αθηνών! Athens, Greece

IMG_9018“Nonfiction is the Real Thing!” This motto was the big posted tagline in the back of my classroom at Infinity (shoutout to Allison!), and I felt like I was living ‘the real thing’ being in Athens as we were experiencing the ‘topography, vegetation, and water’ of this ancient city.  I was excited to see the Acropolis up close as I taught my sixth graders about ancient Greek history and culture back in Harlem.  

The center of the city is called Athens, and the Acropolis is like a beacon seen from every neighborhood and lane.  Attica is the surrounding area of Athens and is full of apartment buildings and storefronts that are most akin to strip malls. These neighborhoods are mostly beige colored buildings and there is a lot of tagging on the sides of the walls.  Some of the blocks are lined with citrus trees that create small sunny green spaces, but about a third of the shops on the outer blocks are run down reminding us of the struggle that Greeks have been facing for the past decade.  On our long walks, we did find neighborhoods that were lively- full of art, evening hangouts and baked goods.  And each time we remarked on the lovely weather with a neighbor or driver or server, they cheerily responded ‘Of course… it’s Greece!’ 

Our airbnb was in the Makryianni district, an easy walk into Athens.  We started our ventures with a very late lunch at Manh Manh.  This pulpo appetizer that could have been a meal on its own, and we had a great white wine.

From lunch we went onto the Acropolis museum, and we had a little over an hour to explore the three floors.  We’d suggest visiting the third level first as this level is floor to ceiling windows making it a great setting for sunset.  On the third floor, I also liked watching the Parthenon video before visiting the ruins as we didn’t have a tour book to guide us when we were at the site the following day.  I told Corey stories of the Greek gods and goddesses as we explored the friezes, metopes, and sculptures on the remaining floors.

For me, Plaka, the old town center, had similar vibes to some of Rome’s narrow lanes: waiters beckon you into their restaurants and the main stone road is packed with souvenir shops.  Strolling the labyrinth of streets gave me the feeling that our evening would be long and relaxed. Greeks don’t go out for dinner until about 9/10pm, but instead of dinner, we found Lukumades, and devoured a snack of fried dough balls smothered in honey.

The Agia Irini Square was buzzing, maybe similar to the lower east side but in a much, much smaller space.  We were on a mission to hit up Clumsies, a recommended cocktail spot!  It’s actually rated as one of the top 50 bars in the world (!) according to the website called worlds50bestbars.com.  The crowd gathers as the evening goes on, but the vibe is very laid back and the music was basically a playlist of the original songs that many current hip hop and r&b artists have sampled.  The Siren was my favorite drink of the night!


Today was Acropolis day (and any other ruins that we could walk to).   Unbeknownst to us, the first Sunday of every month means that you get free entry to all of these sites!  We couldn’t believe our luck!  We started our walk up to the Parthenon by 8.30am.  The East Slope near the Acropolis Museum allows you to see Dionysus Theater and the Odeon of Herod the Atticus, both early amphitheaters.  

The temperature was cool as we walked the path and we could see the view of Attica was breathtaking even though we were only half way up the hill.  The 2500 year old Parthenon has been destroyed and rebuilt many times due to fights between religious groups and rulers. The story goes that Athena, the goddess of wisdom, and Poseidon, the god of the sea, were dueling over Athens to give the city a name.  Athena gave the best offering to the people, the first seed of an olive tree in the ground, and thus became the patron saint of Athens. The Parthenon is dedicated to her, and ancient Greek citizens would enter the lines of Doric columns to visit a towering statue of the goddess.

The walk down to the Roman Agora and the Ancient Temple of Haphaestus is lined with olive trees, green brush and rolling green space.  The Roman Agora illustrated how ancient the city actually is, with very few of the ruins remaining on the green quad.  An agora is a meeting place where ancient Athenians would share their artisic skils, their athletic talents, and their philosophical ideas.

You walk through the large flea market of Monastiraki, full of bric-a-brac and also elderly gentlemen who’ve saddled up to their friend’s stall to have their morning coffee together.  The ancient Agora listed on our map showed many other temples dedicated to various gods, but when we arrived, we realized many of these ruins were almost invisible.  The map was really just illustrating where the temples would have been standing had we visited thousands of years ago.  

The Temple of Haphaestus was the only temple still standing in the ancient Agora.  He is the god of blacksmiths, metalworkers, and is also known as one of the ugliest gods, which is important in his myths as he was married to Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty.  The Stoa of Attalos is also still standing, though rebuilt by American architects in the 1950s from what I can remember.  This long corridor of columns became a marketplace for many Greeks.

We wandered north through the neighborhood of Psyrri with various walls of graffiti art, and modern coffee shops and bars coexisting with warehouses and older apartment buildings.  We lunched at Kavika, a spot on the promenade near the ancient Agora, but I’d venture to go back to Psyrri for food the next trip to Athens.

We endeavored to hike up Lycabettus Hill after lunch, but the walk up to the trailhead itself proved enough of a trek in the afternoon sun.  With so much sun, we opted instead to visit the promenade of Flisvos Marina, where there are expensive yachts and young and old are out having frozen Greek yogurt similar to Pinkberry.  

The tram is easy to catch to Piraeus, where we were on the hunt for a seafood restaurant suggested by Corey’s colleague.  The section of Piraeus we visited felt like a cove surrounded by bars and restaurants with large bay windows looking out on the sailboats.  While the suggested restaurant was actually closed when we arrived, it’s easy to choose another spot for dinner just based on the number of people inside of each location.  We were excited to grab a corner table looking out over the pier while the sun was setting!


We rented a car for the last day to take a day-trip along the Attica coastline.   But first, we had to hit up the Temple of Zeus and the original modern Olympic stadium!  How were these only a 15 minute walk from the car rental place?!

The Temple of Poseidon, out on Cape Sounio, was our actual destination, but with the car, we’d be able to stop along seaside towns as we pleased.  It’s about an hour drive out to Cape Sounio, and the roads wind along the seaside cliffs similar to Route 1 along the California coast.  The air is seaside fresh at the Temple of Poseidon and you can look out and begin to imagine how lovely a trip to the Greek islands must be.


We dipped our toes into the sea on a short pitstop and then headed for Vouliagmeni lake, a thermal spa sunk into the side of a mountain that is warm year round.  For me, it was painted as an idyllic getaway where I’d be seeped in steaming waters.  However, we arrived in the car park and saw the likes of a swimming pool with one side full of plastic chairs.  We voted no on the lukewarm pool.

Instead, we had lunch and then drove to Glyfada, a popular seaside hangout for the “in crowd” of Athens. This basically means there were wide pedestrian sidewalks with plenty of boutiques to get lost in.  We weren’t too interested in shopping at this point, so armed with gelato, we waved goodbye to the shops, the sea, and made for the airport.


Quick Shot:

For Food:

For Sights and Neighborhoods

  • Dedicate one day to the Acropolis! Definitely include the museum if you can.
  • Plaka, Psyrri and Monastiraki neighborhoods
  • Head to the sea to see: Flisvos Marina, Piraeus, and even Cape Sounio for the Temple of Poseidon

 

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Bangkok, Thailand

Khaaaa! Bangkok, Thailand

05Jan2017

Being in a metropolis like Bangkok was strangely comforting, like the buzzing feeling I get when I return to NYC after a long trip away.  The city welcomed us with lights, traffic, Uber, cocktails, rooftops, and shopping malls- all things that I thought would be a turn off after being in such small towns and being so close to nature, yet we fell right into step with the pace of the city.

The first night was actually like eating at a mediocre Thai spot in NYC. We really just went for the name (see below).  We spent the remainder of the evening at Backstage Bar, which had a speak easy vibe.  Thick plush curtains separated each table and dimly lit candles helped you get cozy with the heavily scented drinks (rose, cinnamon, and vanilla).  The hiphop youtube mix was also a familiar and made for an easy night.


06Jan2017

Mr. Ken arrived early for our day trip to Ayutthaya, the second capital in Siam for 417 years!  Our first stop was the Bang-Pa-In Summer Palace, dating back to the 17th century.  It was first used by Prasat Thong from 1629-1656, and then was revived by Rama IV.  It’s really impressive to see a garden and residence so large for one family.  Various architectural styles influence the buildings on site like a Swiss style chalet and a Chinese style throne.

Mr. Ken chuckled ‘I love Americans’ when we declared we were ready for the next stop on the itinerary after just under an hour on the grounds.  Even with a stop for a smoothie along the way, I didn’t see how we needed to spend more time here, but maybe I was missing something? Mr. Ken said that other visitors spend twice as long in the garden alone.  With this pace, we’d definitely get back to the Grand palace and Wat Pho by the afternoon as these were two sites that Mr. Ken highly recommended.

 

We learned how to bow our heads to the reclining Buddha at Wat Lokayasutharam, and then made our way to Wat Mahathat where the roots of a tree surround the head of a Buddha statue.  Visitors should kneel next to the head when snapping a picture so that your head is not higher than Buddha’s.  We enjoyed a set lunch at De Riva Ayutthaya, a riverside restaurant where Mr. Ken ordered us too many noodles. We didn’t think that was possible at this point!

A power nap on the car ride back to Bangkok ensured we were fresh for the Grand Palace.  The Thai King, Bhumibol Adulyadej, passed in October 2016. He was the world’s longest reigning monarch (seventy years!)  Flocks of Thai mourners were visiting from around the country to pay their respects making our Grand Palace visit a historical one.  Folks were dressed entirely in black from head to toe, not just for this visit, but for 100 days after the kings passing- or potentially until he is buried. (see previous pic of Mr. Ken in black)

We actually timed our visit so that we would arrive at the same time as the Royal Family’s motorcade was entering the Palace (just kidding, but it was neat!)  All visitors had to sit on the sidewalk for about twenty minutes until the family was within the Palace walls, giving Corey just enough time to buy elephant pants to ensure he was ‘decent’ for the palace grounds.

The Grand Palace was established in 1782 by Rama I and it definitely lives up to its name.  We spent an hour inside the walls and hadn’t even gotten a peek at the palace at that point.  This complex is home to the renowned Emerald Buddha and various other government offices.  The Buddha is actually carved from a block of jade, and was found in Chiang Rai, a northern Thai city before it found it’s home in Bangkok.  Surrounding the Emerald Buddha’s temple are four other monuments: a Golden Chedi, a Royal Pantheon, the Mondop, where sacred Buddhist scriptures live, and oddly, a miniature model of Angkor Wat.  Scattered around the complex were various statues of mythical creatures to protect these buildings.  During this time, we noted that separate spaces were created for Thai mourners and for foreigners. Foreign visitors were cattle herded through a small gate in order to walk by the Palace. I appreciated that Thai mourners stood/sat in lines where they had food and water provided while they waited to see the revered King.

Wat Pho, aka the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, is a short walk from the Grand Palace.  The Buddha is also as grand as the grounds feel since it is surrounded by chedis and stupas that are iconic to this area.  We caught monks chanting in the large temple space, and Corey spent some time capturing a perfect picture of an archway.

Our dreams of getting a massage at the Wat Pho Massage school were quickly extinguished since the lines were very long and the number system didn’t seem to be getting us anywhere.  However, we figured that the sister campus around the corner must be quite good as well.  After a coffee at the very cute Elefin cafe, we secured a foot massage at the end of their day.

No way that our dinner recommendation was just around the corner from the massage campus!? Too good to be true! Err Rustic Cuisine did not disappoint. It was the best restaurant meal we had on our entire trip.  Thank you, Tamara (Noma’s sommolier)! The phrase ‘err’ is an informal, almost too casual way of saying ‘yes’ in the Thai language.  You’d use this phrase with close family members and friends.  The name was picked to symbolize the causal ambiance of the restaurant.  I actually sighed when I took my first bite of food– the foodie-seeking, big city, tablescape-setting good type of sigh.  Food stalls are another category so there isn’t a comparison here.   We appreciated the house mosquito repellent provided at our table as well.  Our Samui-ferry friends, Whitney and Paolo, recommended Above 11, a rooftop bar, for a cocktail so we snagged a small table and looked out over the city lights and reminisced about our adventures on our last evening.

 


07Jan2017

For the final day on our honeymoon, we did some shopping.  First, we visited Chatuchak Weekend Market, the largest market in Thailand.  It felt as if I was reliving the souk life in Marrakesh with so many vendors, alleys, and shops!  The stalls are packed into one place, and there is a numbering system that I quickly ignored.  We found Pai, and his wonderfully trademarked backpacks.  Hamblepie is a collaboration with Pai and his mom, and we were happy to pick out some new hand-sewn backpacks and other small gifts.

Next, the Terminal 21 mall with floors that are themed after international cities.  This mall brought back memories from my shopping experiences in Japan as nothing was my size except for shoes and watches.

Cabbages and Condoms, a restaurant dedicated to reproductive health and AIDS awareness, was a great choice for lunch!  The gift shop is also a hoot even if you’ve already eaten at another spot.

On our way to the airport, we dreamed that our flight would somehow be delayed during our layover in Kuala Lumpur.  Alas I finished writing this final entry as our plane was landing in London.  Upon our return, we’re trying to work on portion control while still seeking out the best Southeast Asian food in London- potentially these concepts might be mutually exclusive but we’re trying to make it work!


Quick Shot:

  • Visit the Grand Palace and Wat Pho
  • Get a massage if you can at Wat Pho (but most likely any place will do!)
  • You must eat at Err Rustic Cuisine
  • Cabbages and Condoms felt like a decent Thai restaurant in NYC 🙂 The models made of condoms are the best bits!
  • Cocktails here or here are a good look especially on a roof top bar
  • Buy a bag from Hamblepie at the Chatuchak Weekend Market
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